• White House Announcement: UA Health Sciences Commits Biomedical Informatics and Genome Medicine Teams to National Precision Medicine Initiative

    White House Announcement — UA Health Sciences Commits Biomedical Informatics and Genome Medicine Teams to National Precision Medicine Initiative

  • Diagnostics

    Molecular Diagnostics

  • Medical Imaging

    Personalized Medical Imaging

  • Personalized Care Devices

    Personalized Care Devices

Precision Medicine: Delivering the right treatment to the right patient at the right time through early diagnosis and individually tailored treatments....

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The goal of the Center for Applied Genetics and Genomic Medicine (TCAG2M) is to apply genetics and genomic biology to improve healthcare delivery for the people of Arizona. TCAG2M supports outstanding translational and clinical research into the etiology of disease, and the development of new approaches to manage these conditions in the clinic. To achieve this goal, TCAG2M has created divisions in cancer genetics, cardiopulmonary genetics, genetic consultation and counseling, community engagement, genome technologies and innovation, pharmacogenomics, and population genetics to advance our translational and clinical agenda.

The Center is headquartered at University of Arizona Health Sciences and is tightly connected to the health science colleges in Tucson and Phoenix, as well as various colleges and core facilities throughout the University. TCAG2M facilitates precision health at the University of Arizona through several key ways:

Personalized Care Devices

UA physician and biomaterial expert Dr. Marvin J. Slepian is part of a team that has developed biodegradable electronics that could revolutionize medicine, environmental monitoring and consumer electronics.

Molecular Diagnostics

Precision health—using an individual’s genetic profile to guide decisions regarding prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease, including diseases stemming from liver toxicity.

Personalized Medical Imaging

Researchers at the University of Arizona are leading efforts to image the molecular compositions of tumors in patients with cancer, to improve cancer diagnoses and evaluate the earliest responses to cancer treatment.